Riding Along on the Tracks

Theatre Maker. Book Lover. New York City.

There’s this Japanese story—about a woman who loved this man, her soulmate from childhood. Her parents made her marry a farmer. She ran off anyway with her soul mate and had kids with him. Years later, she comes back to her family and says: “I’m sorry I ran away.” And they say: “What? You’ve been here the whole time, you’ve been ill, in bed.” And she meets the other version of herself, this ghost, and she embraces this woman, and they become one person. And it’s this Buddhist parable, like: which one is the ghost?

Ever since I left you I thought that in some parallel ghost world we had kids we rowed by a canal…I thought part of me would be a ghost forever, without you. I was no longer real even when I was happy. But no, all along in real time you’ve gone on being you and I’ve gone on being me and yes I really love you enough to be ghosted by you my entire life but my God I left you for a reason.

—"Stage Kiss" by Sarah Ruhl (via jbildungsroman)

(via fuckyeahgreatplays)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

In a new project called “OMG, Who Stole My Ads?” French street artist Etienne Lavie makes it his mission to transform the ad space in Paris into an outdoor art gallery. He has been travelling around the city, snatching up posters and billboards, and replacing them with fine specimens of French art from an earlier era. If our senses have over-developed to the point where we need to be visually stimulated at all times outdoors, just to keep up continuity, then we might as well at least occasionally glimpse something that moves us—something we might elect to look at voluntarily. Lavie’s project gives that gift to a lucky subset of Parisian commuters.

(Source: asylum-art, via post-impressionisms)

Once upon a time there was an iron who fell in love with a wrinkle.
It was a tragedy. The end.
Once upon a time there was a lightbulb who fell in love with the darkness.
It was a tragedy. The end.

Passion Play, Sarah Ruhl

a play a day

(via bouncingpenguin)